Wednesday, November 2, 2011

Everyone Deserves a Voice

One of the things that I discovered living in and around the rich and elite most of my life, is my perception that the rich and elite truly believe they are smarter than the rest of us. Now that assessment is not an absolute and like all things life, there are exceptions. But as a general rule this was my observation having associated with and listened to- hundreds of rich people. That included a billionaire or two.

Warren Buffett is a fantastic example of this. Warren gets a lot of media attention and says some profoundly stupid shit. However, because he has billions of dollars, society somehow thinks Warren is far more credible than everyone else in matters well beyond the scope of his expertise- money gathering. In fact, Warren is plagued by some of the very problems that plague many of us. His personal life is far from perfect. In fact, he kind of sounds like an asshole. Yet oddly, we don't hear how he estranges his loved ones: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Warren_Buffett

One of the things that the rich and elite are very good at is hiding their flaws and mistakes. Socially engineering your family to appear perfect is a science with these people. Coming off less than perfect or "run-of-the-mill" is simply unacceptable. The inner fear that somehow they are not special extends to every facet of their lives. They must have the finest homes, the finest cars, the best schooling, the best cosmetic facelifts, dentristry, boob jobs, and tummy tucks that money can buy. Trophy wives and trophy toys. They are forever wanting and never satisfied. It's like a sickness. But what really sets them apart I believe, are the trophy egos that they acquire as they set about their engineered lives. Many of these people truly believe that they are exceptional. Left unchecked that false sense of self- those ginormous egos, will run right over the top of you. They are superior.

The rich and elite are not something to be worshipped. I have never fallen for that idiocy. But in Moonbat Valley, where everyone worships money, worshipping the people that have money might make you rich and... sometimes it does. Ego worship goes on all of the time in Moonbat Valley. The worshippers cannot understand those of us who don't become members of their church.

I really don't care for those that worship the rich and elite. I don't have the slightest bit of contempt for the rich and elite or their worshippers. That's not my point. It's when those giant egos try to drown out everyone else. Tell us how we should behave. Or what we should think. Whether fetuses are humans, whether God exists, or how fantastic they are because they donated 100 million to the Bill and Linda Gates Foundation. Or signed some contract to give away their wealth. In fact, I find the rich and elite kind of predictable and boring. Sometimes...

I want to find Warren Buffett and tell him to shut the fuck up. Really. I am sick of him. There are 316 million other people in the United States. I'd rather listen to any one of them than listen to Warren tell me how his secretary pays more in taxes than he does.

There are millions of people with fantastic stories to tell. Stories of great triumph, of miracles, of tragedy. Not superficial or socially engineered people. Mainstream people that did not hit the birth lottery. Those are the people who interest me. People not afraid to tell of their triumphs and failures. People with very little who are happy and grateful. Not forever wanting. These are the people that I cannot hear because the media is not interested in them or in many cases because they themselves don't think they are interesting. That's too bad. I think they could unlock a mystery or two.

People are entitled to their opinions and beliefs. Not because they are the product of some socially engineered and superficially perfect life- but because they aren't. I love to hear from everyday working stiffs. Everyone deserves a voice and I pray that the day never comes when this society decides that only the people with material wealth are worthy of our attention. Like buying stocks, pirating a computer language, or stealing interest on bank loans makes you some sort of God among men. In fact, it may be that those people- the people who refuse to worship that socially engineered and artificial lifestyle- are the ones that we should really be paying attention to.

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

Brian, you are kind of awesome for saying the things a lot of us feel.

I live in Boston where there is no shortage of elitists who love to congratulate each other on the many ways they dictate how everyone else should live.

I say everyone else, because the rich elite almost never actually have to suffer directly from the all the rules they advocate because they can afford to workaround any unintended consequences.

Higher taxes don't affect their personal lifestyles any, so why not push make everybody pay more? That way, they can get credit for being rich, successful, AND compassionate! Sweet!

Do anybody really think Teddy Kennedy would have gone to a regular government doctor for his brain tumor if we had nationalized healthcare?


And you are right, they do actually believe they are superior. Especially academics. I mean, it's all they have. If they were not allowed to believe they were part of the special smart people's club...if somehow they found out that most people can actually survive just fine without their help...where would their self-worth come from?

Just being an ordinary honest and decent person, parent, neighbor? I don't think so. How could they be a hero and congratulated if the world was not dependent on them?


Thanks for the fresh air.

Anonymous said...

I think that was the lesson of that old movie 'trading places' - once you take these people out of their BS wall street environment, they really don't have any marketable skills.

Love to see these bankers out huntin' with Brian for a week - now that would be funny.